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Lucky11 | Disrupting the flow of a hand in poker !


Lucky11 | Poker
Lucky11 | Poker

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When you do something that your opponent does not expect, you are interrupting the movement of the hand. This usually causes your opponents to become concerned about the strength of their hand. Disrupting the flow can accomplish a variety of goals, but it performance generally to confuse your opponents. So, if you believe that complicating your opponent is necessary in a specific scenario, disrupt the flow.


The normal flow of a hand

Forget about specific hands and concentrate on the regular flow of a typical hand. Assume that Players A, B, as well as C are seated side by side in that order. Player A checks, Player B checks, and Player C bets on the flop. Then, players A and B make a call. A and B double-check as they approach the turn. C frequently bets again. Perhaps one or both will call. On the river, player A and/or B check again, and player C either shows down or makes a final bet.


Disruption of the flow

Interfering with the cycle above is effectively disrupting the flow. Assume you are player A. Assume you check-raised the flop or bet on the turn after C bet the flop. You'd be disrupting the expected flow of the hand, and your play usually affects both B and C. A word of caution: this is a weapon to be used with caution. If you use it too frequently, it will lose its effectiveness. Use it only when it is advantageous to confuse or scare your opponents.


From the perspective of my opponents

First, consider this hand from the perspective of the loose player. When I bet on the turn, the loose player is put in a tough spot. He's aware that at least one of us has a pair of queens or better. Furthermore, if he calls with a weak or drawing hand, the third player may raise. Unless he has a strong hand, he will most likely fold.


I'm relieved to see him give up. I'd like this loose player to fold if I'm ahead on the turn and he has a hand like J-6 suited. If I put the third player on with AK, I don't want to lose this pot to the loose player if a jack or 6 falls on the river. I increased the number of safe river cards in my hand by pushing him out (if I have the best hand on the turn).


My outs are 4, 7, 8, or 9 even if my hand is not in front of the third player (which was the case in this hand). If this loose player has a 4, 7, 8, or 9 in the hole, he will limit my outs. For example, if he has a 9, a seven on the river gives him a straight and gives me two pair. So, while I would defeat A-Q, I would lose to this inexperienced player. Because I prefer to have every possible out when I am behind, I want him to fold and leave all of the outs to me. When I disrupted the flow of the hand, I achieved my goal (getting him to fold).


Now let's look at this hand from the perspective of the third player

He is holding A-Q and raised before the flop. He has a good position on the two callers. The flop consists of Q-5-6. This is excellent. He bets confidently after two checks, and both opponents call. He's already sketched out the rest of the hand. He'll bet the turn and then the river, winning a decent pot. It's a given. He now has a kind of. He let down his guard by becoming too comfortable with his hand.


On the turn, an 8 falls, which appears to be fairly innocuous to him. I come out betting all of a sudden. This third player just can't seem to get me on a hand. He is now perplexed because he thought he had this hand won with AQ. Maybe I'll get a set in? Is it possible that I hit a straight? Is it possible that I made two pairs? Is it possible that I played pocket Kings slowly before the flop? I've broken the flow of this hand, and he's completely disoriented. All he can think about is how I might have beaten him. So he calls and says he'll call me down on the river. I checked to him after an irrelevant card fell on the river. So he calls me and wants to call me to the river. I checked when an irrelevant card landed on the river. It passed behind me because it appears to be a possible check-raise attempt on my part.